Home

I use DAP Wood Bleach (Oxalic Acid).

Savogran 10501 Wood Bleach, 12 oz

$5.14


You can find it at Wal-mart or Ace hardware for sure in powder form

The next step was a slurry of acetone and chalk mixed to a consistency just runny enough to apply with an acid brush. I painted this area to pull out any material that was contributing to the stain. This was effective at further reducing the stain but didn’t eliminate it. I had one more trick up my sleeve with two courses of “DAP Wood Bleach” on the entire stock which did the trick. The stain was gone and the wood was now crying “uncle!”

I had already removed all the finish from the top of the ice box. I mixed a tablespoon of Dap Wood Bleach in a cup of warm water, applied the mixture with a 1-inch paint brush, and let it sit for about 30 minutes. I applied a second coat and let that sit for another 30 minutes. I repeated the same process 8 times until the black water stain was completly removed. I then applied the Wood Bleach to the entire top and let it sit for 30 minutes because I was concerned that the bleached area would be lighter than therest of the top. This step was probably not necessary. Finally, I wiped the top 7 times using a water-soaked rag that I rinsed thorougly between each wipe.

The Home Depot México; Home Decorators Collection;

Roll-Monroe-Co 04-02-08 09:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dwoloz (Post 6446835)
I went to a local True Value and found wood bleach crystals in a small container for $7 (as above). The small container goes a long way when used sparingly.

+1. I have had a giant tub in the basement going on one container of DAP wood bleach for weeks. I'm starting to run out of rusty stuff. :eek:

It's a bit slow going, but the results can be amazing. Advice I've gotten on this forum has been excellent:

* Don't mix it too strong (like I was doing, a whole 10-oz tub of DAP in three gallons of water--my parts were encrusting with nasty yellow-green precipitate-stuff (converted rust, i assume), which, when I laboriously scrubbed/wire wheeled off, hid quite a lot of un-eaten rust).

* It takes a while (like a few days, sometimes) to eat all the rust, depending on the rustiness. Whatever strength you use, REGULARLY (like at least once every twelve hours), take the part out of the solution and scrub with a (non-metallic) scrub brush or other softer-than-chrome abrasive to get rid of the nasty yellow-green stuff, free loosened rust, and loosen other rust. This dramatically speeds the process, and you get to see the progress you make toward lovely shininess. It's fun!

* I haven't done this yet, but I'm a believer. When you're done de-rusting, give the part a thorough scrubby bath in regular soapy water. Then use a base agent (i.e. baking soda) ... I'm not sure how, dissolved in water? to neutralize any remaining OA hiding in crevices and inside the part. Rinse, dry thoroughly, then wax the bejeezus out of it or otherwise use some sort of preservation agent. Certain metal polishes, for example, promise both to clean and protect afterward.

Tonight I pulled a Schwinn tubular rim out of the bath. It had been sort of, I dunno, rust colored when it went into the OA bath. But I pulled it out, wiped it off, and, as I was inspecting it, it caught the light and almost blinded me. Amazing!

My $.02. Thanks to Old Fat Guy and a cast of C&V thousands for my Oxalic Acid orientation.

Eric

is an operating company of RPM International Inc

The next step was a slurry of acetone and chalk mixed to a consistency just runny enough to apply with an acid brush. I painted this area to pull out any material that was contributing to the stain. This was effective at further reducing the stain but didn’t eliminate it. I had one more trick up my sleeve with two courses of “DAP Wood Bleach” on the entire stock which did the trick. The stain was gone and the wood was now crying “uncle!”

Paul Andersen:
I just found another source for people to check, if you don't want to do mail order.

Try a marine supply or boating supply, OA is great for cleaning Teak, and you know how picky those boaters are! The product is Macspacs Oxalic Acid -Teak Cleaner about $5 for 2 Pounds at a local marine supply store.

I checked the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) on DAP Wood Bleach and it call out 100% OA, which is probably fairly close because the MSDS is a OSHA regulated document.

If you are picky about purity and quality you can try looking under Lab supplies in the yellow pages. This is generally more expensive at $15 to $20 per pound.